Yiddish for IT Leaders

I have come to the conclusion that I need to know more yiddish.  Can I use it as a code to hide what I am really thinking?  Help bypass any email filters?  Just make me feel better.  Here is my arsenal.

bupkis – As in – you don’t know bupkis.

chutzpah – There is always one team member with too much of this.

glitch – Things are late again?  It must be another glitch.

kibitz – What we should call reviews.

klutz – You don’t want this and a programming to go together.

kvetch – What I do when I get home from work.

nudnik – In management speak these are the team members you manage out.

schmuck – What you call someone who changes something directly in production – first.

schtik – A little off topic, but I think of Benji Bronk on the radio on my way into work.

shpiel – My weekly team briefings have at least one of these.

yutz – Yiddish has lots of fun words for describing people that bum you out.

WordPress and Word

Microsoft Word has a feature to use Word to compose and publish a blog entry. I have used this periodically and have had mixed feelings about it. Now that I am hosting my own blog using WordPress I wanted to test this feature out again. How does it work with formatting different things and how well does the overall look and feel match the rest of the blog?

Here is some code…

static bool RenameFile(FileInfo fi, string newFullFilename)
{
   try
   {
        fi.MoveTo(newFullFilename);
        Console.WriteLine(“New={0}”, newFullFilename);
   }
   catch (Exception ex)
   {
       Console.WriteLine(“Error {0} renaming {1}”, ex.Message, newFullFilename);
        return false;
}
   return true;
}

 

Here is a picture…

I notice that it does not do multi column or other more advanced formatting normally available in Word. Maybe I will give this a shot since it does give you the robust spelling/grammar checking of Word.

PS.  I had to go into this post from the WordPress editor and clean up the code section.  The different way of single spacing something using <p> vs <br> is the issue.  Every line of code is a <p> when in fact I want it to end with <br>.  Oh well.  Not as good as I hoped.

I took the code above and plugged it into the code formatter I previously blogged about here.  It looks like the following, which in preview mode looks pretty good.

 static bool RenameFile(FileInfo fi, string newFullFilename)  
 {  
   try  
   {  
      fi.MoveTo(newFullFilename);  
      Console.WriteLine(“New={0}”, newFullFilename);  
   }  
   catch (Exception ex)  
   {  
     Console.WriteLine(“Error {0} renaming {1}”, ex.Message, newFullFilename);  
     return false;  
   }  
   return true;  
 }  

 

PowerPoint Linking to Excel Issue

When updating a link (right click Update Link) or editing a linked object (double click on the object) in PowerPoint the user receives a dialog box (shown below) stating “The linked file was unavailable and can’t be updated” . Here is a document I wrote that describes how to fix this issue. We encountered this issue in Excel 2007 sp2.